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Rochelle-Leigh (Shelley) Rosenberg is a trial and appellate litigator. As a counsel in Crowell & Moring's Washington, D.C. office, she practices in the Litigation and Health Care groups and is also a member of the Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice, which is a cross-section of all of the firm's regulatory groups. Shelley's practice primarily includes representing health care providers, managed care organizations, and other health care entities in various litigation matters. Shelley maintains an active practice. She litigates education access cases on behalf of parents of children with special needs.

Shelley is also a member of the Children's Law Center Advisory Board. She recently spoke on the Washington Council of Lawyers — Representation of Children and Families Panel at the Summer Pro Bono & Public Interest Forum about how to fit work into one’s practice. She also serves on the Emerging Leaders Committee of Tzedek DC, an independent public interest center at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law. Tzedek DC’s mission is to safeguard the legal rights of low-income DC residents facing often unjust, life-altering debt collection lawsuits, and other consumer protection crises.

In Gresham v. Azar, United States District Court for the District of Columbia Judge James E. Boasberg “[found] its guiding principle in Yogi Berra’s aphorism, ‘It’s déjà vu all over again.’” No. CV 18-1900 (JEB), 2019 WL 1375241, at *7 (D.D.C. Mar. 27, 2019). In striking down the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) approval of Arkansas’s Medicaid work requirements as “arbitrary and capricious,” Judge Boasberg noted that the agency’s failures were “nearly identical” to those in Stewart v. Azar I, 313 F.Supp.3d 237, 243 (D.D.C. 2018), where he vacated the agency’s approval of Kentucky’s Medicaid Work requirements back in June 2018. The same day the Court issued Gresham, Judge Boasburg declared “[t]he bell now rings for round two” and again vacated Kentucky’s Medicaid work requirements finding the agency’s reaproval “arbitrary and capricious” in Stewart v. Azar II. No. CV 18-152 (JEB), 2019 WL 1375496, at *1 (D.D.C. Mar. 27, 2019).

Under Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, HHS may approve a state’s waiver application and allow a state to waive certain Medicaid program requirements. Such waivers include “experimental, pilot, or demonstration project[s]” that “in the judgment of the Secretary, [are] likely to assist in promoting the [Medicaid Act’s] objectives.” 42 U.S.C. § 1315(a). In March 2017, Seema Verma, the Administrator for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”), along with HHS Secretary at the time, Thomas Price, sent a letter to state governors clarifying the agency’s “intent to use existing Section 1115 demonstration authority to review and approve” Medicaid work requirements. Heeding this call, the governor of Kentucky applied for a Section 1115 waiver to implement an experimental program which includes work requirements as a condition of Medicaid coverage. Under these work requirements, many adults must complete 80 hours of employment or other qualifying activities every month or lose their Medicaid coverage. These requirements primarily target the Medicaid expansion population (individuals who obtained coverage after states expanded eligibility under the Affordable Care Act). Arkansas’ program—which took effect last June as the first work requirements in the history of Medicaid—is substantially similar to the Kentucky program. The Kentucky work requirements had yet to take effect.

Continue Reading Federal District Court Judge Vacates Arkansas and Kentucky’s Medicaid Work Requirements

On April 17th, Crowell & Moring’s Government Affairs and Health Care Groups hosted speakers from Capitol Hill, federal agencies, and national trade groups during a thought-provoking half-day Long Term Care Policy Update forum (“LTC Forum”).  The LTC Forum was spearheaded by James Flood and Scott Douglas, who recently joined the firm from the Government Affairs division at Omnicare, a leader in the long-term pharmacy industry. 

The LTC Forum focused on overall policy affecting the long-term care industry, which the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Congress, and other government agencies have consistently scrutinized.  Throughout the day, LTC Forum participants discussed the challenges and opportunities present in the long-term care industry that will only increase as payment reforms become the norm in Medicare. 

Of note, Sarah Johnson, the Legislative Assistant for U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH) gave a timely overview of the negotiations that led up to the ultimate passage and signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  MACRA repealed the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula for Medicare payments to physicians and phases in a new Merit-Based Incentive Payment System and other alternative payment models over the next ten years.  But MACRA partially funds these payment reforms with reductions to market basket updates for post-acute care providers, which creates increased concern from the industry about sustainability of long-term care providers under health reform initiatives.  According to one audience comment, there is concern that “in the long-term care industry, [stakeholders] are going to lose sight of overall health care industry shifts.”  

Continue Reading Crowell’s Long-Term Care Policy Update—Recapping the Discussions and Debates

On December 23, 2014, FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg announced that the agency favors supplanting the outright ban on blood donations from men who have sex with men (MSM) with a new policy that would prohibit donations from men who have engaged in homosexual activity in the previous 12 months. This shift for MSM would