On November 1, 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) filed the pre-publication version of the CY 2019 Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule (“2019 PFS Final Rule”). Within this massive publication, CMS finalized two regulatory changes affecting the exceptions at 42 CFR § 411.357 to the Physician Self-Referral Law (also known as the “Stark Law”) for compensation arrangements. The 2019 PFS Final Rule reconciles the regulations with the statutory changes made to the Stark Law enacted by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (“2018 BBA”) with respect to (1) how arrangements may fulfill the “writing” requirement under the compensation exception and (2) how arrangements that initially proceed without a signed agreement may still meet the signature requirement of an applicable exception. Parties to financial arrangements in effect on or after February 9, 2018 that implicate the Stark Law may rely upon these new modifications.

The Stark Law generally prohibits a physician from making a referral of designated health services (“DHS”) to an entity with which he or she (or an immediate family member) has a financial relationship. Section 411.357 details several excepted compensation arrangements carved out from the “financial relationship” definition for the purposes of the Stark Law. These exceptions include arrangements for the rental of office space and equipment, bona fide employment relationships, group practice arrangements with hospitals, certain fair-market-value compensation arrangements, among others. Continue Reading 2019 Physician Fee Schedule Rule Modifies Stark Regulations to Reflect Statutory Changes

CMS has finalized the adoption of multiple CPT codes in the CY 2019 PFS that create more opportunities for providers and digital health companies to collaborate on chronic care management business models in the fee-for-service market.

Virtual Check-Ins

CMS finalized the creation of a new code to reimburse providers for brief “check-in” services conducted using communications technology by creating HCPCS code G2012, defined as “[b]rief communication technology-based service, e.g. virtual check-in.” Continue Reading Digital Health Updates in the 2019 Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) Rule

Yesterday, the FDA released draft guidance on the management of cybersecurity in medical devices submitted to the agency for premarket review. Noting that cybersecurity threats to the healthcare sector have increased in number and severity, the FDA offered new recommendations for device design, labeling, and documentation that medical device manufacturers will need to consider during premarket submission processes.

The guidance comes shortly after the FDA’s launch of its Medical Device Cybersecurity Playbook, which provides a framework for healthcare delivery organizations to use in preparing for and responding to cybersecurity threats against patient medical devices.

Given rapid changes in technology and increasing innovation in the digital health market, the guidance intends to decrease the risk of cyberattacks that could render medical devices inoperable and potentially harm patients. Comments on the draft guidance are due on March 18, 2019. Continue Reading FDA Issues New Guidance for the Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices

On October 15, 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services (“CMS”) in the Department for Health and Human Services proposed a rule to require prescription drug manufacturers to post the Wholesale Acquisition Cost (“WAC”) for drugs and biological products covered by Medicare or Medicaid in direct-to-consumer television advertisements. The WAC reflects the manufacturer’s list price for a drug to direct purchasers, not inclusive of any discounts or rebates. CMS is proposing this rule in the context of broadcast advertisements, an area in which the Supreme Court has recognized that the government may take special steps to help ensure that viewers receive appropriate information.[1]

CMS stated that 47 percent of Americans have high-deductible health plans and that many patients may pay the list price of the drug until they meet their deductible. The proposed rule aims to provide greater transparency into the prices charged by prescription drug manufacturers. The theory is that markets operate more efficiently with greater transparency, and that increased exposure of the list price will also provide a moderating force to discourage price increases. While wholesale prices do not equate to the patient’s out-of-pocket obligation, CMS asserts that benefit designs are impacted by WACs, and patients in high-deductible plans may pay the full list price until meeting their deductible – thus, the WAC may still be relevant to many patient and impact their decisions and market dynamics. The price required to be posted would be for a typical course of treatment for an acute medication like an antibiotic, or a thirty day supply of medication for a chronic condition that is taken every month. The posting would take the form of a legible textual statement at the end of the ad and would not apply where the list price for a thirty day supply or typical course of treatment of a prescription drug was less than $35. Continue Reading CMS PROPOSES RULE TO REQUIRE PRESCRIPTION DRUG MANUFACTURERS TO DISCLOSE DRUG PRICES IN TV ADS

On October 3rd, the United States Senate passed a bipartisan opioids package with a sweeping vote of 98 to 1, after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the final version of the bill with a vote of 393 to 8. One of its components, the “Fighting the Opioid Epidemic with Sunshine Act,” expands the scope of reporting requirements under the Physician Payment Sunshine Act (known as the “Sunshine Act”), which will have immense implications for the pharmaceutical and medical device and supply industries.

Enacted at section 6002 of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 to increase transparency around the financial relationships between health care providers and drug manufacturers, the Sunshine Act requires “applicable group purchasing organizations” and “applicable manufacturers,” including pharmaceutical and medical device or supply companies with operations in the United States, to track and report payments and transfers of value that they make to “covered recipients,” currently defined to include physicians and teaching hospitals. These transfers of value include items such as consulting fees, honoraria for speaking events, and research grants.

The opioids legislation package expands the definition of “covered recipients” to include other types of health care professionals: physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives. The new legislation additionally sunsets a prohibition in the Sunshine Act that prevents the inclusion of the National Provider Identifier on the CMS Open Payments website.

Given the Administration’s focus on the opioid crisis, identified as a “national emergency,” the expansion of the Sunshine Act reflects the reality that prescriptions of opioids and other drugs to individuals may come from health professionals who are not physicians. State “sunshine laws” that imposed reporting requirements on payments to these professionals have existed for a number of years, but the changes passed in the opioids package would make this standard the baseline for reporting covered payments nationwide. By the time these changes would be effective on January 1, 2022, applicable group purchasing organizations and manufacturers will need to update their Sunshine Act compliance and monitoring activities to account for the greatly enlarged scope of individual health care professionals to whom they may be providing direct or indirect transfers of value.

The expansion of the Sunshine Act’s covered recipient definition was introduced in the Senate version of the opioids package, and remained in the overall legislation despite vigorous opposition. To become law, the bill requires the signature of President Trump.

Federal agencies are signaling closer oversight of Medicaid managed care organizations (“MCOs”). On August 21, 2018, the U.S. Comptroller General Gene Dodaro and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) Administrator Seema Verma testified to the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee about combating Medicaid fraud and urged additional oversight of Medicaid MCOs and a larger restructuring of the Medicaid program. This testimony follows other steps taken by the Governmental Accountability Office (“GAO”) and CMS earlier this year to encourage increased scrutiny of Medicaid managed care programs. Continue Reading GAO and CMS Seek Increased Scrutiny on Medicaid Managed Care Organizations

CMS has issued its 2019 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule, containing highly anticipated new reimbursement policies for telehealth, remote monitoring, and other uses of digital tools, as well as updates to health IT requirements in the Quality Payment Program, with a stronger focus on patient access to health information. Comments are due September 10 at 5pm.

Continue Reading New CMS Incentives for Remote Patient Monitoring and Patient Access

Next week, on June 21, 2018, attorneys from Crowell & Moring will hold a bootcamp entitled “Early Stage Investing in Health Technology.” Crowell & Moring attorneys will present on topics of interest to entrepreneurs, investors, and early stage health technology companies. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about a range of matters including formation of a start-up, protection of intellectual property, FDA and product safety requirements, and how to commercialize a product through government and commercial reimbursement. Specifically, the bootcamp will feature the following presentations:

  • Building an Investible Health Tech Company;
  • IP Basics for Health Tech;
  • Navigating The Existing Regulatory and Product Safety Landscape In A New Digital World;
  • Healthcare Reimbursement:  Commercialization Strategies and Approaches; and
  • Adding Value: Managed Care Contracting Issues.

The bootcamp is a co-sponsored event with the Inova Center for Personalized Health (“ICPH”). Following the bootcamp, there will be a networking reception and panel presentation on the State of Heathcare Investing. For more information, contact a participant listed below or your regular Crowell & Moring contact.

Crowell & Moring Participants:

A. Xavier Baker

Troy A. Barsky

Lex Eley

Michael H. Jacobs

Lisa A. Adelson

Rebecca Baden Chaney

Joe Records

Roma Sharma

Maya Uppaluru

Chalana N. Williams

Danielle Winston

 

This blog post has been prepared in collaboration with Validic. Mr. Schiller is CEO of Validic. Jodi Daniel is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Health Care Group in Washington, D.C.


Our healthcare system is in the midst of a fundamental shift toward value-based care to drive down costs and improve the quality of care. We won’t be able to achieve that goal without technology that allows providers to collect and use health data and puts patients front and center. Patient access to clinical and claims data is essential. When patients have access to their own information, they can better understand their condition and feel empowered to ask questions and shape their own care plan.

Congress and the federal government are pushing to liberate data from within the healthcare system and to promote patient access to health information. However, it is equally important to focus on the flow of data from the patient back into the healthcare system. The patient – who is gathering data at home, managing her condition, and making day-to-day decisions that impact her health – holds information that is critical to treatment decisions and outcome improvements. Continue Reading Transforming the Patient-Provider Relationship: A Comprehensive Approach to Patient Access and Patient-Generated Health Data

On April 17, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its Medical Device Safety Action Plan which outlines FDA’s intended steps to address medical device safety while preserving enough space for innovation in the market.

The FDA’s plan is the latest effort by the FDA on medical device safety, including a recent budget request seeking $70 million to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health that would, among other things, craft new regulations for third-party certification for developing medical devices. This comes as FDA is pushing guidance and innovative approaches for oversight of digital health (see our blog).

According to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s announcement, the FDA’s plan organized into five points that seek to balance patients’ timely access to devices and safety and effectiveness. Continue Reading FDA’s Medical Device Safety Action Plan