In its recent notice of proposed rulemaking setting policy for Medicare Advantage (MA) and the Prescription Drug Program (PDP) for calendar year 2020, CMS announced that it would establish extrapolation as a method to be used in risk adjustment validation (RADV) audits, and further, that it would not make any adjustments to account for errors in Medicare fee for service data in determining recovery amounts.

CMS uses a risk adjustment process to modify MA plan payments to better reflect the relative risk of each plan’s enrollees. Payments to each MA plan are adjusted based on risk scores that reflect enrollees’ health status (categorized into Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs)) and demographic characteristics derived from member claims data. To counteract incentives that a plan might have to over-report enrollee diagnoses, CMS emphasizes that all diagnoses submitted to enhance risk must be documented in a medical record, and uses RADV audits to ensure that medical record documentation exists, and thus, that payments to MAOs accurately reflect the level of risk assumed. Continue Reading CMS Announces and Solicits Comments on Expanded RADV Audit Methodology

This blog post has been prepared in collaboration with Nemours. Ms. Boyer is a Manager of Nemours Children’s HospitalMaya Upplauru is an associate in Crowell & Moring’s Health Care Group in Washington, D.C.

This Bulletin is brought to you by AHLA’s Children’s Health Affinity Group, which is part of the Academic Medical Centers and Teaching Hospitals and In-House Counsel Practice Groups.

One of the most fear-inducing experiences for new and first-time parents is the middle of the night illness of a young child. Many may head directly to the emergency department (ED) because they lack any means to communicate with their health care provider after-hours. Parents of children with chronic conditions or rare diseases are often forced to travel long distances to see specialists at regional centers of excellence and may struggle to check in or get questions answered once they are back at home. Teenagers managing chronic conditions may prematurely discontinue their treatment plan when they transition to college in a different state or when they enter the working world after college. Continue Reading Delivering Virtual Pediatric Care Across State Lines: Regulatory Barriers and Opportunities

Federal agencies are signaling closer oversight of Medicaid managed care organizations (“MCOs”). On August 21, 2018, the U.S. Comptroller General Gene Dodaro and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) Administrator Seema Verma testified to the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee about combating Medicaid fraud and urged additional oversight of Medicaid MCOs and a larger restructuring of the Medicaid program. This testimony follows other steps taken by the Governmental Accountability Office (“GAO”) and CMS earlier this year to encourage increased scrutiny of Medicaid managed care programs. Continue Reading GAO and CMS Seek Increased Scrutiny on Medicaid Managed Care Organizations

CMS has issued its 2019 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule, containing highly anticipated new reimbursement policies for telehealth, remote monitoring, and other uses of digital tools, as well as updates to health IT requirements in the Quality Payment Program, with a stronger focus on patient access to health information. Comments are due September 10 at 5pm.

Continue Reading New CMS Incentives for Remote Patient Monitoring and Patient Access

Building on momentum from Administrator Seema Verma’s announcement of the MyHealtheData initiative at HIMSS 2018, CMS has published more clues as to future action to liberate health information for patients.

In the CY 2019 call letter to Medicare Advantage organizations and Part D programs, CMS describes the Blue Button 2.0 project and its use of the interoperable application programming interface (API) standard Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR). CMS encourages Medicare Advantage plans to adopt “data release platforms” that either meet or exceed the capabilities of Blue Button 2.0, and makes it clear that the agency intends to pursue rulemaking requiring such adoption for 2020.

The FHIR standard is also discussed, although not required, in the 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria for API access, regulations promulgated by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) that set the rules for functionality and interoperability of electronic health record systems. It seems likely that ONC further promote FHIR for API-based patient access in their upcoming rulemaking updating the certification program, expected this summer.

This move from CMS arrives alongside increased Congressional interest in patient access to information about the cost of healthcare services. This includes a recent Senate price transparency initiative led by Senator Bill Cassidy. Almost 1000 pages of feedback have already been received by Senate staffers, describing why and how payers and providers can make healthcare price and cost information more accessible for individual patients.

Health plans that wish to get ahead of the future regulatory action can check out the developer resources for Blue Button 2.0 to see how CMS envisions API access working for payer data. Plans can also participate in an ongoing ONC Tech Lab project to learn more about on how these standard resources can be used for health plan-specific information and influence standards development.

The Health Care Group’s newest partners, William S.W. Chang and Laura M. Kidd Cordova, along with Counsel Stephanie D. Willis, have authored an Alert about the 21st Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) annual report released last Friday.  The HCFAC report is a joint effort of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that describes the expenditures, results, and enforcement actions of the previous fiscal year.  The authors note that compared to FY 2016, other than expanded efforts to combat the opioid crisis, enforcement remained more or less consistent with prior trends.  In monetary terms, HCFAC spending slightly increased, while overall monetary recovery and returns on investment in fraud prevention efforts significantly decreased.  Interestingly, however, the proportion of overall recoveries resulting from HHS auditing activities considerably increased.

Read the rest of the Alert’s analysis of the HCFAC report and register for our webinar next Tuesday, April 17th.  During the webinar, listeners will hear Will and Stephanie, who were attorneys employed by DOJ and the HHS Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG), respectively, give their insights about the significance of the report for health care companies and the health care industry.

 

On March 22, 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that would, if finalized, exempt states with high rates of Medicaid beneficiaries in managed care plans from monitoring and reporting requirements related to Medicaid service access set forth in 42 C.F.R. §§ 447.203 and 447.204. The regulations currently require states to analyze and document the impact of Medicaid fee-for-service (FFS) payment amounts on beneficiary access to covered health care services in access monitoring review plans (AMRPs) submitted to CMS.

States’ AMRPs must, using a data-driven process, address the impact of Medicaid FFS payments on beneficiaries’ access to the following categories of Medicaid services: primary care services, physician specialist services, behavioral health services, pre- and post-natal obstetric services, and home health. The state must update and submit the AMRP related to these service categories to CMS at least every three years. If a state reduces Medicaid FFS rates for services outside of these categories, the state must include those additional services in the AMRP and publicly monitor the rate reductions for three years.

Since the adoption of these requirements, several states have complained that the scheme imposes an undue administrative burden and that it is not an efficient use of limited state program resources. In response, the proposed rule’s changes to the regulations would allow the following:

  • An exemption from most access monitoring requirements for states with an overall Medicaid managed care penetration rate of 85% or greater (currently, 17 States).
  • An exemption from the specific access analysis for reductions to provider payments below the “nominal payment rate change” of 4% in overall service category spending during a state fiscal year (and 6% over two consecutive years).
  • A state to submit an assurance that its baseline data “indicates current access is consistent with requirements of the Social Security Act,” rather than be required to predict the effects of proposed Medicaid FFS rate reductions or restructurings on access to care.

This NPRM aligns with the Trump Administration’s push to “cut the red tape” and to generally reduce states’ administrative burdens under federal programs. The proposed changes are also consistent with CMS’s other efforts to enable states to focus on patient outcomes rather than processes in administering their Medicaid programs, as quantified in the agency’s estimates that the proposed changes will eliminate 561 administrative hours and save a total of $1.66 million for the affected states.

Comments on the proposed rule are due to CMS no later than May 22, 2018.

On March 6, 2018 at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2018 conference, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma announced a new initiative furthering the current Administration’s focus on value-based care and increasing patient access to healthcare data. The initiative — called MyHealthEData — will be led by the White House Office of American Innovation, in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CMS, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). (CMS press release here.) Continue Reading Liberating Data to Transform Value-Based Care: MyHealthEData, Blue Button 2.0, and Price Transparency

On Thursday, March 8, the Trump Administration rejected Idaho’s plan to sell health plans that do not include the consumer protections required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The rejection came in the form of a letter touting adherence to current law, though in many ways the letter was written by an apologetic Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wanting to appease Idaho Republicans.

Earlier this year, Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter signed an executive order that allowed some Idaho health insurance plans to drop certain ACA requirements. For example, plans would not need to cover maternity care, mental illness, or other essential health benefits; insurers could charge higher premiums to those with preexisting conditions; and insurers could deny people coverage if they had failed to maintain continuous coverage. Insurers who sold such “junk” plans would be required to also sell at least one ACA-compliant option over the exchanges. Gov. Otter’s actions seemed to test just how far Alex Azar, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, would go to support the “state experimentation” Mr. Azar himself advocated for under the exchanges, as discussed in our earlier post. The answer, for Idaho, is not far enough. Continue Reading Trump Administration Rejects (Nicely) Idaho’s Attempt to Skirt ACA

Congress is considering several adjustments to health IT policy which may have significant impact on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (“CMS”) electronic health records (“EHR”) incentives. On July 20th and 21st, Representatives met to discuss bipartisan legislation to improve the Meaningful Use program and introduced legislation that would authorize a CMS Innovation Center (“CMMI”) project to incentivize EHR adoption by behavioral health providers. The bills may be indicative of Congress’ attitude towards the Meaningful Use program, which has garnered criticism from providers for being burdensome.

On July 21, 2017, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a hearing on H.R. 3120 and featured testimony from Cletis Earle, Chairman-Elect of the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives. The bill, sponsored by a group of bipartisan lawmakers, will allow CMS to modify the requirements of the Meaningful Use program in order to give the Secretary additional flexibility in implementing the program. Currently, providers and vendors must comply with the Stage 3 measures and objectives of the Meaningful Use program starting January 1, 2018 or be subject to Medicare reimbursement penalties. Earle argued that the implementation timeline for Stage 3 of the program is too rigorous for providers to meet and may lead to an increase in hardship exemption applications. Provider and vendor groups across the industry have suggested that the HHS Secretary Tom Price delay the Stage 3 obligations, noting that software implementation and cybersecurity issues have made the 2018 deadline unreasonable. Sponsors of H.R. 3120 note that the bill will reduce the burden on providers’ use of EHR systems, allowing providers to focus on care coordination and patient outcomes. In response, CMS noted that the proposed “Medicare Program; CY 2018 Updates to the Quality Payment Program,” which is open for comment through August 21, 2017, would give eligible providers an additional year to implement EHR technology that complies with the 2014 or 2015 edition of Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (“CEHRT”) and offers the opportunity to apply for hardship exemptions for the Advancing Care Information performance category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (“MIPS”). For more information, see our update on key proposals of the 2018 Proposed Rule here. Continue Reading Congress Remains Focused on Electronic Health Records