On February 25, President Obama addressed a small audience at the White House, identifying the need for patient participation in health care and the importance of individualizing treatments for a particular patient. Obama said that precision medicine can lead to reduced costs, better care, and a more efficient health care system.  He stated “the health care system is actually more of a disease-care system in which the patient is passive, you wait until you get sick, a bunch of experts then help you solve it,” and that precision medicine is about “empowering individuals to monitor and take a more active role in their own health.” His remarks were quite genuine and showed his personal interest in precision medicine as he seemed to talk “off script” with his panelists.

A year ago the President launched the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to accelerate medicine that delivers the right treatment at the right time to the right person, taking into account individuals’ health history, genes, environments, and lifestyles. This includes efforts by the NIH to build a 1 million-person voluntary national research cohort who will partner with researchers, share data, and engage in research to transform our understanding of health and disease through precision medicine.  It also includes efforts by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), which has enrolled over 450,000 Veterans in the Million Veteran Program (MVP), a participant-driven research cohort.Vice President Biden’s cancer moonshot initiative builds on this initiative.Continue Reading President Obama Addresses Precision Medicine, Health IT, Data Access, and Security

A key event in Congress affecting health information technology occurred last week when two members of the Senate HELP Committee issued a discussion draft of their bipartisan legislation on health information technology (health IT).  This ambitious bill addresses many of the same areas as other recent bills, including information blocking, transparency, a star rating system

Featured Industry: Health Care
Spotlight on Best Practices, Litigation, Antitrust, and Tax for Health Care Companies

Crowell & Moring LLP is pleased to release its “2016 Litigation & Regulatory Forecasts: What Corporate Counsel Need to Know for the Coming Year.” The reports examine the trends and developments that will impact health care companies and other corporations in the coming year—from the last year of the Obama administration to how corporate litigation strategy is transforming from the inside out. This year will bring remarkable change for companies, as market disruptions and the speed of innovation transform industries like never before, and the litigation and regulatory environments in which they operate are keeping pace.Continue Reading Crowell & Moring’s 2016 Litigation & Regulatory Forecasts: What Corporate Counsel Need to Know for the Coming Year

On January 7, 2016, the HHS Office for Civil Rights released guidance on individuals’ right to access health information under the HIPAA Privacy Rule. The guidance clarifies areas of confusion and non-compliance by covered entities and business associates, particularly in light of the proliferation of electronic health records and electronic health information. Areas of emphasis

Our colleagues at Data Law Insights have written about the HHS Office of Civil Rights’ $750,000 settlement with the University of Washington Medicine (“UWM”) announced this week.  This third settlement in as many weeks confirms that the security risk analysis continues to be a linchpin of OCR enforcement under the HIPAA Security Rule.  Indeed, the