Last week, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized long-awaited regulations on Interoperability and Patient Access (the “CMS Rule”) to require Medicare Advantage plans, Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care plans, state agencies, and Qualified Health Plan (QHP) issuers on federally-facilitated exchanges (“CMS Payers”) to provide patients easy access to their claims and encounter information, as well as certain clinical information, through third-party applications of their choice. On the same day, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology finalized its rules on Interoperability, Information Blocking, and the ONC Health IT Certification Program (the “ONC Rule”) related to the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures Act). The CMS Rule and ONC Rule have far-reaching impacts.

As individuals and organizations covered by the rules are considering how they may facilitate their access to health information to support patients, health care providers, and others, it is important to understand when provisions in the rules will be effective and timing and what acts may constitute violations of these rules.  To help clients get familiar with these deadlines, we are providing this summary chart of compliance requirements and applicable deadlines to help your organization prepare for upcoming enforcement of the ONC Rule and the CMS Rule.  For legal advice tailored to the specific needs of your organization, please reach out to Jodi Daniel, head of the firm’s Digital Health Practice at jdaniel@crowell.com.

As you read the chart, you should keep the following in mind:


Continue Reading Compliance Reference Chart for ONC and CMS Interoperability Rules

Congress is considering several adjustments to health IT policy which may have significant impact on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (“CMS”) electronic health records (“EHR”) incentives. On July 20th and 21st, Representatives met to discuss bipartisan legislation to improve the Meaningful Use program and introduced legislation that would authorize a CMS Innovation Center (“CMMI”) project to incentivize EHR adoption by behavioral health providers. The bills may be indicative of Congress’ attitude towards the Meaningful Use program, which has garnered criticism from providers for being burdensome.

On July 21, 2017, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a hearing on H.R. 3120 and featured testimony from Cletis Earle, Chairman-Elect of the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives. The bill, sponsored by a group of bipartisan lawmakers, will allow CMS to modify the requirements of the Meaningful Use program in order to give the Secretary additional flexibility in implementing the program. Currently, providers and vendors must comply with the Stage 3 measures and objectives of the Meaningful Use program starting January 1, 2018 or be subject to Medicare reimbursement penalties. Earle argued that the implementation timeline for Stage 3 of the program is too rigorous for providers to meet and may lead to an increase in hardship exemption applications. Provider and vendor groups across the industry have suggested that the HHS Secretary Tom Price delay the Stage 3 obligations, noting that software implementation and cybersecurity issues have made the 2018 deadline unreasonable. Sponsors of H.R. 3120 note that the bill will reduce the burden on providers’ use of EHR systems, allowing providers to focus on care coordination and patient outcomes. In response, CMS noted that the proposed “Medicare Program; CY 2018 Updates to the Quality Payment Program,” which is open for comment through August 21, 2017, would give eligible providers an additional year to implement EHR technology that complies with the 2014 or 2015 edition of Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (“CEHRT”) and offers the opportunity to apply for hardship exemptions for the Advancing Care Information performance category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (“MIPS”). For more information, see our update on key proposals of the 2018 Proposed Rule here.
Continue Reading Congress Remains Focused on Electronic Health Records