C&M Health Law

C&M Health Law

Analysis, commentary, and the latest developments in health care law and policy

Early Stage Investing in Health Technology

Posted in Digital Health, Digital Transformation, Medicaid, Medicare
Crowell & Moring Events

Next week, on June 21, 2018, attorneys from Crowell & Moring will hold a bootcamp entitled “Early Stage Investing in Health Technology.” Crowell & Moring attorneys will present on topics of interest to entrepreneurs, investors, and early stage health technology companies. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about a range of matters including formation of a start-up, protection of intellectual property, FDA and product safety requirements, and how to commercialize a product through government and commercial reimbursement. Specifically, the bootcamp will feature the following presentations:

  • Building an Investible Health Tech Company;
  • IP Basics for Health Tech;
  • Navigating The Existing Regulatory and Product Safety Landscape In A New Digital World;
  • Healthcare Reimbursement:  Commercialization Strategies and Approaches; and
  • Adding Value: Managed Care Contracting Issues.

The bootcamp is a co-sponsored event with the Inova Center for Personalized Health (“ICPH”). Following the bootcamp, there will be a networking reception and panel presentation on the State of Heathcare Investing. For more information, contact a participant listed below or your regular Crowell & Moring contact.

Crowell & Moring Participants:

A. Xavier Baker

Troy A. Barsky

Lex Eley

Michael H. Jacobs

Lisa A. Adelson

Rebecca Baden Chaney

Joe Records

Roma Sharma

Maya Uppaluru

Chalana N. Williams

Danielle Winston

 

Transforming the Patient-Provider Relationship: A Comprehensive Approach to Patient Access and Patient-Generated Health Data

Posted in Health IT
C&M Health LawJodi G. Daniel

This blog post has been prepared in collaboration with Validic. Mr. Schiller is CEO of Validic. Jodi Daniel is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Health Care Group in Washington, D.C.


Our healthcare system is in the midst of a fundamental shift toward value-based care to drive down costs and improve the quality of care. We won’t be able to achieve that goal without technology that allows providers to collect and use health data and puts patients front and center. Patient access to clinical and claims data is essential. When patients have access to their own information, they can better understand their condition and feel empowered to ask questions and shape their own care plan.

Congress and the federal government are pushing to liberate data from within the healthcare system and to promote patient access to health information. However, it is equally important to focus on the flow of data from the patient back into the healthcare system. The patient – who is gathering data at home, managing her condition, and making day-to-day decisions that impact her health – holds information that is critical to treatment decisions and outcome improvements. Continue Reading

FDA’s Medical Device Safety Action Plan

Posted in Digital Health, FDA, Health IT
Jodi G. DanielMaya UppaluruTraci VitekPayal Nanavati

On April 17, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its Medical Device Safety Action Plan which outlines FDA’s intended steps to address medical device safety while preserving enough space for innovation in the market.

The FDA’s plan is the latest effort by the FDA on medical device safety, including a recent budget request seeking $70 million to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health that would, among other things, craft new regulations for third-party certification for developing medical devices. This comes as FDA is pushing guidance and innovative approaches for oversight of digital health (see our blog).

According to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s announcement, the FDA’s plan organized into five points that seek to balance patients’ timely access to devices and safety and effectiveness. Continue Reading

FDA Advances Flexibility-Based Framework for Digital Health and AI

Posted in FDA, Health IT, Medicaid, Medicare
Jodi G. DanielAshley N. SoutherlandMaya Uppaluru

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced several new initiatives that reflect its ongoing commitment to maintain patient safety, while also championing the need and opportunity for health care innovation.

During opening day of Health Datapalooza, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb highlighted the critical import of novel digital health tools in achieving patient-centered care, and outlined how the agency is committed to moving the ball forward in health care innovation through the following initiatives:

  1. Multi-Function Device Draft Guidance. FDA’s new draft guidance, “Multiple Function Device Products: Policy and Considerations,” explains the FDA’s regulatory approach to multi-function digital health devices—where some functionalities fall under the FDA’s definition of a medical device, and other functionalities do not. The guidance, mandated by the 21st Century Cures Act, provides examples in which the FDA will review certain functional software capabilities in a medical device. Consistent with previous guidance and risk-based frameworks from the FDA, the agency’s enforcement focus will be on medical device functions that diagnose and treat patients. For example, data analysis will be considered a device function for which the FDA would enforce compliance, but data tracking and trending will not.
  2. Software Precertification Pilot Program Expansion and “Pre-Cert 1.0” Roll-Out. Gottlieb outlined three updates to the Software Pre-Cert Pilot Program, originally announced last Fall. The FDA will hold a “user session” on May 10, 2018 to discuss the agency’s general progress on the pilot program, and to conduct an in-depth discussion of the three updates:
    • Draft Working Model – An initial framework and vision which outlines the program’s key components: Excellence Appraisal and Determining Precertification Level, Review Pathway Determination, Streamlined Premarket Review Process, and Monitoring Real-world Performance.
    • Challenge Questions – Key questions about various components of the Pre-Cert program for stakeholders to consider with regard to the areas outlined in the Draft Working Model.
    • Roadmap – An overview of the program’s milestones and timeline toward launching the first version of the program (“PreCert 1.0”).
  3. Expansion of Digital Health Tools for Drug Development. The FDA announced its intention to establish clear policies for integrating the review and validation of digital health tools into drug development programs. The FDA will publish a policy framework, through new guidance, and seek public input on the best practices to incorporate software intended for use with prescription drugs.
  4. Precertification Approach to Artificial Intelligence (AI). Gottlieb recognized the novel role that AI and machine learning can have on the medical device submission process (obviating the need to make multiple submissions) and new software validation tools. Gottlieb also discussed “employing the Pre-Cert approach to AI.” This suggests the FDA’s interest in a more effective approach to regulation of medical devices that use AI. This announcement expands upon the FDA’s brief mention of regulatory oversight of devices using “proprietary algorithms,” included in December’s Draft Clinical Decision Support and Patient Decision Support Guidance. (See our prior blog post analyzing the guidance.)
  5. Premarket Digital Safety Program Launch. Gottlieb announced the creation of a Premarket Digital Safety Program, which would allow for electronic submissions of premarket safety reports for an Investigational New Drug Application.
  6. Information Exchange and Data Transformation Incubator. Gottlieb announced the agency’s new digital health/technology incubator, to be known as the Information Exchange and Data Transformation (INFORMED). The incubator will initially be launched in the cancer context, with fellowship collaborations between the FDA and the National Cancer Institute, as well as with Harvard on AI and machine learning. Crowell & Moring’s Digital Health team is ready to assist with the submission of industry input, as well as strategic counseling on these issues.

The various initiatives, guidance, and calls for industry input reflect the FDA’s quest to be flexible in the face of digital health opportunity and innovation. Not only will the FDA’s newest initiatives support its quest to advance safe, patient-centered care, but these initiatives will provide the regulatory predictability critical to encouraging business investment in innovative technologies and products.

Crowell & Moring’s Digital Health team is ready to assist with the submission of industry input, as well as strategic counseling on these issues.

The Freight Train Gathers Steam: An Update on the Federal Response to the Opioid Crisis

Posted in FDA, Medicaid, Medicare
Ashley N. SoutherlandPayal NanavatiJodi G. DanielTraci Vitek

Despite the Trump Administration’s declaration of a state of emergency on October 26, 2017, the federal response to the opioid crisis largely languished on the back burner—much to the chagrin of states in the trenches of the opioid epidemic. However, based on the flurry of activity over the past several weeks, the federal government response now seems to be gathering substantive momentum, with various agencies and government actors launching attacks on all fronts—administrative, legislative, and enforcement alike. The federal government’s recent efforts present opportunities for health care organizations, life sciences companies, and health tech companies to get involved at the ground level to help influence opioid policy and provide needed products, services, and support to reduce the incidence of opioid abuse and address the health care needs of patients.

Continue Reading

CMS Signals Future Patient Access Requirements for Medicare Advantage Plans

Posted in Health IT, Medicare
A. Xavier BakerJodi G. DanielMaya Uppaluru

Building on momentum from Administrator Seema Verma’s announcement of the MyHealtheData initiative at HIMSS 2018, CMS has published more clues as to future action to liberate health information for patients.

In the CY 2019 call letter to Medicare Advantage organizations and Part D programs, CMS describes the Blue Button 2.0 project and its use of the interoperable application programming interface (API) standard Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR). CMS encourages Medicare Advantage plans to adopt “data release platforms” that either meet or exceed the capabilities of Blue Button 2.0, and makes it clear that the agency intends to pursue rulemaking requiring such adoption for 2020.

The FHIR standard is also discussed, although not required, in the 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria for API access, regulations promulgated by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) that set the rules for functionality and interoperability of electronic health record systems. It seems likely that ONC further promote FHIR for API-based patient access in their upcoming rulemaking updating the certification program, expected this summer.

This move from CMS arrives alongside increased Congressional interest in patient access to information about the cost of healthcare services. This includes a recent Senate price transparency initiative led by Senator Bill Cassidy. Almost 1000 pages of feedback have already been received by Senate staffers, describing why and how payers and providers can make healthcare price and cost information more accessible for individual patients.

Health plans that wish to get ahead of the future regulatory action can check out the developer resources for Blue Button 2.0 to see how CMS envisions API access working for payer data. Plans can also participate in an ongoing ONC Tech Lab project to learn more about on how these standard resources can be used for health plan-specific information and influence standards development.

Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program FY 2017: Insights from Our Enforcement Team

Posted in Fraud, Waste & Abuse
Christopher Flynn

The Health Care Group’s newest partners, William S.W. Chang and Laura M. Kidd Cordova, along with Counsel Stephanie D. Willis, have authored an Alert about the 21st Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) annual report released last Friday.  The HCFAC report is a joint effort of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that describes the expenditures, results, and enforcement actions of the previous fiscal year.  The authors note that compared to FY 2016, other than expanded efforts to combat the opioid crisis, enforcement remained more or less consistent with prior trends.  In monetary terms, HCFAC spending slightly increased, while overall monetary recovery and returns on investment in fraud prevention efforts significantly decreased.  Interestingly, however, the proportion of overall recoveries resulting from HHS auditing activities considerably increased.

Read the rest of the Alert’s analysis of the HCFAC report and register for our webinar next Tuesday, April 17th.  During the webinar, listeners will hear Will and Stephanie, who were attorneys employed by DOJ and the HHS Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG), respectively, give their insights about the significance of the report for health care companies and the health care industry.

 

Iowa Enacts Legislation to Broaden Access to Association Health Plans

Posted in ERISA, Exchanges, Health Care Reform & ACA
A. Xavier BakerJoseph Records

Iowa has enacted legislation to permit the offering of certain health benefit plans that would not be subject to the restrictions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The bill combined two separate measures, each intended to expand access to association health plans (AHPs) that are exempt from many of the ACA’s protections. First, the new law would allow small employers to band together to form associations that would be eligible to offer members’ employees coverage as if they were a single large employer group, which would be subject to less burdensome regulation under the ACA. Second, a health benefit plan sponsored by a nonprofit agricultural organization domiciled in Iowa (the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation) and covered by a third-party administrator that has administered the organization’s health benefits plan for more than 10 years (Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield) is exempt from the definition of insurance that is subject to regulation by the state insurance department.

Recently, AHPs have been touted by opponents of the ACA as a tool to avoid its effects for larger covered populations. Iowa’s measure follows an executive order by President Trump last fall directing the administration to, among other things, promote the use of AHPs. In response to that order, the Department of Labor proposed a rule that would expand the definition of AHP to allow employers greater access to AHP coverage. As we noted in a previous post, several states have pressed the idea through comments to that proposed rule that expanded access to AHPs would create opportunities for employers to offer more affordable coverage.

The impact of Iowa’s enactment remains to be seen. Critics of the measure have expressed concern that it will water down consumer protections by exempting coverage from ACA requirements that plans cover essential health benefits, such as maternity and mental health care. Although plans could continue to include such benefits, they would not be legally obligated to do so, and could cut costs by eliminating coverage for broad categories of health care. Continue Reading

CMS Proposed Rule Would Reduce States’ Health Care Access Monitoring Requirements

Posted in Administrative Law, Medicaid
Stephanie WillisMatthew Vicinanzo

On March 22, 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that would, if finalized, exempt states with high rates of Medicaid beneficiaries in managed care plans from monitoring and reporting requirements related to Medicaid service access set forth in 42 C.F.R. §§ 447.203 and 447.204. The regulations currently require states to analyze and document the impact of Medicaid fee-for-service (FFS) payment amounts on beneficiary access to covered health care services in access monitoring review plans (AMRPs) submitted to CMS.

States’ AMRPs must, using a data-driven process, address the impact of Medicaid FFS payments on beneficiaries’ access to the following categories of Medicaid services: primary care services, physician specialist services, behavioral health services, pre- and post-natal obstetric services, and home health. The state must update and submit the AMRP related to these service categories to CMS at least every three years. If a state reduces Medicaid FFS rates for services outside of these categories, the state must include those additional services in the AMRP and publicly monitor the rate reductions for three years.

Since the adoption of these requirements, several states have complained that the scheme imposes an undue administrative burden and that it is not an efficient use of limited state program resources. In response, the proposed rule’s changes to the regulations would allow the following:

  • An exemption from most access monitoring requirements for states with an overall Medicaid managed care penetration rate of 85% or greater (currently, 17 States).
  • An exemption from the specific access analysis for reductions to provider payments below the “nominal payment rate change” of 4% in overall service category spending during a state fiscal year (and 6% over two consecutive years).
  • A state to submit an assurance that its baseline data “indicates current access is consistent with requirements of the Social Security Act,” rather than be required to predict the effects of proposed Medicaid FFS rate reductions or restructurings on access to care.

This NPRM aligns with the Trump Administration’s push to “cut the red tape” and to generally reduce states’ administrative burdens under federal programs. The proposed changes are also consistent with CMS’s other efforts to enable states to focus on patient outcomes rather than processes in administering their Medicaid programs, as quantified in the agency’s estimates that the proposed changes will eliminate 561 administrative hours and save a total of $1.66 million for the affected states.

Comments on the proposed rule are due to CMS no later than May 22, 2018.

Federal Employees Health Benefits Program 2018 Carrier Conference Highlights

Posted in Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB)
C&M Health LawJoseph Records

On Thursday, March 22, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) hosted the annual Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program Carrier Conference. The conference featured OPM’s policy and contracting priorities for the FEHB Program for 2018. It followed and discussed OPM’s FEHB Program Call Letter (available here), which provides a high-level outline of its intentions for contract negotiations for plan year 2019.

This year’s Carrier Conference included three key highlights for FEHB carriers:

  1. OPM will re-open the Indemnity Benefit Plan to contract with either a nationwide carrier or a consortium of carriers to begin offering coverage in 2020.
  2. OPM is seeking legislative changes to apply the Anti-Kickback Statute to the FEHB Program.
  3. OPM is interested in Plans improving value by offering Accountable Care Organization or other innovative models

Continue Reading