Many states are looking to adapt their Medicaid programs to address new challenges related to COVID-19, including by increasing coverage and protection for Medicaid enrollees. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has issued guidance on the types of measures that states can take to change their Medicaid programs.

In an FAQ addressed to state Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program agencies, CMS addressed questions from states, saying that states may have flexibility to cover telehealth services, accelerate or relax prior authorization requirements, expand provider networks, extend Medicaid eligibility, and suspend copayments, although some of these measures may require CMS’ waiver of federal requirements or approval of changes to the state Medicaid plan.

On March 22, CMS released checklists and tools that guide Medicaid programs through the processes of seeking expedited approval of such changes and waivers, including section 1115 demonstration waivers, section 1135 waivers, Appendix K of section 1915(c) home and community-based services waivers, and disaster amendments to the state plan. In the associated press release, the Trump Administration indicated that the tools could be used by states to “access emergency administrative relief, make temporary modifications to Medicaid eligibility and benefit requirements, relax rules to ensure that individuals with disabilities and the elderly can be effectively served in their homes, and modify payment rules to support health care providers impacted by the outbreak.” CMS is providing states the options to request waivers effective retroactively to March 1.


Continue Reading CMS & State Medicaid Agencies Seek to Expand Enrollee Protections During COVID-19 Pandemic

On March 22, 2019 CMS issued new guidance to State Medicaid Directors on implementation of the 2014 Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) rule. The 2014 HCBS rule required states to scrutinize facilities, including an assisted living facilities or group homes, receiving HCBS funding to make sure they met certain standards. The 2014 rule aimed to define the characteristic of “community based” to move these settings and facilities away from the qualities of an “institution.” In May of 2017, CMS delayed implementation of the rule and in response to concerns regarding the transition process, a three year extension was granted. The transition period for states to ensure provider compliance with the criteria for settings in which a transition period applies has now been extended to March 17, 2022 during which states may work with all existing HCBS providers to complete their remediation and be validated as fully complying with the settings criteria. Not meeting these standards could mean loss of Medicaid funding.

The new CMS guidance, issued as an FAQ, defines a setting that is isolating individuals as a facility that limits any opportunities for patients and residents to interact with the broader community. Certain settings are presumed under the regulations to have the qualities of an institution:
Continue Reading CMS Issues New Guidance to States on Home and Community Based Services