This blog post has been prepared in collaboration with Validic. Mr. Schiller is CEO of Validic. Jodi Daniel is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Health Care Group in Washington, D.C.


Our healthcare system is in the midst of a fundamental shift toward value-based care to drive down costs and improve the quality of care. We won’t be able to achieve that goal without technology that allows providers to collect and use health data and puts patients front and center. Patient access to clinical and claims data is essential. When patients have access to their own information, they can better understand their condition and feel empowered to ask questions and shape their own care plan.

Congress and the federal government are pushing to liberate data from within the healthcare system and to promote patient access to health information. However, it is equally important to focus on the flow of data from the patient back into the healthcare system. The patient – who is gathering data at home, managing her condition, and making day-to-day decisions that impact her health – holds information that is critical to treatment decisions and outcome improvements. Continue Reading Transforming the Patient-Provider Relationship: A Comprehensive Approach to Patient Access and Patient-Generated Health Data

Building on momentum from Administrator Seema Verma’s announcement of the MyHealtheData initiative at HIMSS 2018, CMS has published more clues as to future action to liberate health information for patients.

In the CY 2019 call letter to Medicare Advantage organizations and Part D programs, CMS describes the Blue Button 2.0 project and its use of the interoperable application programming interface (API) standard Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR). CMS encourages Medicare Advantage plans to adopt “data release platforms” that either meet or exceed the capabilities of Blue Button 2.0, and makes it clear that the agency intends to pursue rulemaking requiring such adoption for 2020.

The FHIR standard is also discussed, although not required, in the 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria for API access, regulations promulgated by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) that set the rules for functionality and interoperability of electronic health record systems. It seems likely that ONC further promote FHIR for API-based patient access in their upcoming rulemaking updating the certification program, expected this summer.

This move from CMS arrives alongside increased Congressional interest in patient access to information about the cost of healthcare services. This includes a recent Senate price transparency initiative led by Senator Bill Cassidy. Almost 1000 pages of feedback have already been received by Senate staffers, describing why and how payers and providers can make healthcare price and cost information more accessible for individual patients.

Health plans that wish to get ahead of the future regulatory action can check out the developer resources for Blue Button 2.0 to see how CMS envisions API access working for payer data. Plans can also participate in an ongoing ONC Tech Lab project to learn more about on how these standard resources can be used for health plan-specific information and influence standards development.

On March 6, 2018 at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2018 conference, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma announced a new initiative furthering the current Administration’s focus on value-based care and increasing patient access to healthcare data. The initiative — called MyHealthEData — will be led by the White House Office of American Innovation, in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CMS, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). (CMS press release here.) Continue Reading Liberating Data to Transform Value-Based Care: MyHealthEData, Blue Button 2.0, and Price Transparency

Congress is considering several adjustments to health IT policy which may have significant impact on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (“CMS”) electronic health records (“EHR”) incentives. On July 20th and 21st, Representatives met to discuss bipartisan legislation to improve the Meaningful Use program and introduced legislation that would authorize a CMS Innovation Center (“CMMI”) project to incentivize EHR adoption by behavioral health providers. The bills may be indicative of Congress’ attitude towards the Meaningful Use program, which has garnered criticism from providers for being burdensome.

On July 21, 2017, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a hearing on H.R. 3120 and featured testimony from Cletis Earle, Chairman-Elect of the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives. The bill, sponsored by a group of bipartisan lawmakers, will allow CMS to modify the requirements of the Meaningful Use program in order to give the Secretary additional flexibility in implementing the program. Currently, providers and vendors must comply with the Stage 3 measures and objectives of the Meaningful Use program starting January 1, 2018 or be subject to Medicare reimbursement penalties. Earle argued that the implementation timeline for Stage 3 of the program is too rigorous for providers to meet and may lead to an increase in hardship exemption applications. Provider and vendor groups across the industry have suggested that the HHS Secretary Tom Price delay the Stage 3 obligations, noting that software implementation and cybersecurity issues have made the 2018 deadline unreasonable. Sponsors of H.R. 3120 note that the bill will reduce the burden on providers’ use of EHR systems, allowing providers to focus on care coordination and patient outcomes. In response, CMS noted that the proposed “Medicare Program; CY 2018 Updates to the Quality Payment Program,” which is open for comment through August 21, 2017, would give eligible providers an additional year to implement EHR technology that complies with the 2014 or 2015 edition of Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (“CEHRT”) and offers the opportunity to apply for hardship exemptions for the Advancing Care Information performance category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (“MIPS”). For more information, see our update on key proposals of the 2018 Proposed Rule here. Continue Reading Congress Remains Focused on Electronic Health Records

On September 26, 2016, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released guidance, entitled EHR Contracts Untangled, to help providers navigate the complexities of electronic health record (EHR) vendor contracting. The guidance breaks down important considerations for selecting EHR systems, and provides strategic pointers – including sample contract language – to help facilitate the contracting process. While the guidance is largely an attempt to level the playing field for providers in the EHR arena, it also has broader applicability to contract negotiations for a variety of other digital health tools.

For the most critical “need-to-know” points from ONC’s new guidance, see our recent client alert.

Crowell & Moring and Accenture co-hosted a conference, “Fostering Innovative Digital Health Strategies,” in late-June. The program aimed to provide a broad analysis of the business and legal issues that must be addressed as health care organizations and technology companies consider innovative strategies to use digital health technologies.

The first session of the conference, “Trends in the Health Care Economy’s Internet of Things,” featured the following distinguished panelists: Zane Burke (president, Cerner); Jodi Daniel (partner, Crowell & Moring); Cheryl Falvey (partner, Crowell & Moring); Melissa Goldstein (assistant director, Bioethics and Privacy Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President); and Kaveh Safavi (senior managing director, Global Health Industry Lead, Accenture).

A series of five videos from the session can be watched below:

Here are key health care Internet of Things (IoT) trends discussed in Session 1:

Continue Reading 6 Trends in the Health Care Economy’s Internet of Things

On June 23, Crowell & Moring and Accenture co-hosted the Fostering Innovative Digital Health Strategies Conference in Crowell’s D.C. office. The goal of the conference was to take a comprehensive look at all of the business and legal issues that need to be addressed as health care organizations and technology companies are considering innovative strategies using digital health technologies. The conference covered a wide array of digital health topics, including trends in the healthcare Internet of Things, setting up digital health platforms, legislative activity regarding health IT and telehealth, privacy, cybersecurity, and use of digital health technology to support new payment models.

Session 2, “Setting up a Platform for Digital Health,” featured panelists Jodi Daniel (Partner, Crowell & Moring), Bakul Patel (Associate Director for Digital Health, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA), Anna Shimanek (Senior Legal Counsel, CVS Health), Paul L. Uhrig (EVP, Chief Administrative, Legal, & Privacy Officer, Surescripts) and Ronan Wisdom (Managing Director, Accenture Digital).  Key takeaways include:

  • New partnerships are emerging. There is a broad movement among a variety of stakeholders – providers, payors, consumers, technology companies, and the government – toward using digital health to improve communicating with providers and patients’ understanding of their own health. This leads to new opportunities to partner with other organizations and require strategies for doing so effectively from a legal and business perspective.

Continue Reading In Case You Missed It . . . Five Key Takeaways in Developing Digital Health Platforms

Earlier this month, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released a report to Congress on the feasibility of creating tools to help providers compare and select certified health IT products. As part of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA), Congress required ONC to conduct a study to examine the feasibility of establishing mechanisms to assist providers in comparing and selecting certified EHR technology products. Congress suggested that ONC consider mechanisms like establishing a website of aggregated survey results that would allow meaningful EHR users to directly compare the functionality of certified health IT products. Congress also suggested compiling information from vendors of certified health IT products, and making that information publicly available in a standardized format.

In response to its Congressional directive, and drawing upon recommendations from the Certified Technology Comparison (CTC) Task Force, public input, and its own market analysis, ONC’s report focused on two subgroups of the health care community – providers and comparison tool developers – and identified specific problem areas in the comparison tool marketplace. Ultimately, the report proposed four mechanisms to improve the health IT comparison marketplace:

Continue Reading The Rise of the One-Stop Shop? ONC Outlines Four Mechanisms to Help Providers Compare Certified Health IT Products

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) is looking for input on federal policy related to the Internet of Things (IoT).  On April 5, NTIA published a request for comment on federal efforts to promote IoT efforts and foster innovation.  The Department of Commerce will use the comments to develop a “green paper” identifying key issues affecting deployment of IoT technologies, potential challenges and opportunities, and possible roles for the federal government.  A “green paper” is typically used as a first step before policy changes are advanced.

Given the breadth of industries affected by IoT, including health care, transportation, and energy, and the vast number of issues that industry and government are grappling with, it is important to ensure that NTIA hears from a variety of sectors and experts on the impacts of IoT and where government can be helpful or interfere with innovation.  The NTIA poses 28 questions for comment including questions about technology, policy, infrastructure, economic impact, and international engagement.  The deadline for filing comments is May 23, 2016.  Crowell & Moring is available to assist in preparing comments.

On February 25, President Obama addressed a small audience at the White House, identifying the need for patient participation in health care and the importance of individualizing treatments for a particular patient. Obama said that precision medicine can lead to reduced costs, better care, and a more efficient health care system.  He stated “the health care system is actually more of a disease-care system in which the patient is passive, you wait until you get sick, a bunch of experts then help you solve it,” and that precision medicine is about “empowering individuals to monitor and take a more active role in their own health.” His remarks were quite genuine and showed his personal interest in precision medicine as he seemed to talk “off script” with his panelists.

A year ago the President launched the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to accelerate medicine that delivers the right treatment at the right time to the right person, taking into account individuals’ health history, genes, environments, and lifestyles. This includes efforts by the NIH to build a 1 million-person voluntary national research cohort who will partner with researchers, share data, and engage in research to transform our understanding of health and disease through precision medicine.  It also includes efforts by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), which has enrolled over 450,000 Veterans in the Million Veteran Program (MVP), a participant-driven research cohort.Vice President Biden’s cancer moonshot initiative builds on this initiative.

Continue Reading President Obama Addresses Precision Medicine, Health IT, Data Access, and Security