Potentially overlooked between the enactment of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the FFCRA) on March 18 and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the CARES Act) on March 27, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit heard oral argument via teleconference on March 20 in Ass’n for Cmty. Affiliated Plans v. U.S. Dep’t of Treasury, No. 19-05212 (D.C. Cir. July 30, 2019). At issue in that case is the fate of a Trump Administration rulemaking expanding the scope of non-ACA compliant short-term limited duration insurance (STLDI) plans. Already controversial—with some arguing that STLDI plans increase access to health care, while others decry them as misleading consumers and destabilizing the individual insurance market—STLDI plans are of particular import given the COVID-19 pandemic.

As millions face unemployment, lose access to employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, and qualify to seek coverage via a special enrollment period, others may look to STLDI policies to obtain at least some coverage in the wake of COVID-19. But, as with ACA requirements such as essential health benefits and community rating, STLDI plans are not subject to the recently enacted zero-dollar cost-sharing and other coverage requirements for COVID-19 diagnostic testing.


Continue Reading Appeals Court Hears Argument on Short-term, Limited Duration Insurance Plan Rule; STLDI Plans are not Required to Provide $0 Cost-share of COVID-19 Diagnostic Testing

In a victory for the Trump Administration, on July 18, 2019, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia upheld a 2018 regulation designed to expand the sale of short-term, limited duration insurance policies and rejected claims that the regulation unlawfully undermined the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) and would destabilize the ACA marketplaces. Plaintiffs have indicated that they will appeal the decision.

Short-term, limited duration insurance policies are not required to comply with ACA protections, including those relating to essential health benefits like maternity care and prescription drugs. Originally designed to fill very short gaps in coverage, these types of plans were not included in the definition of individual health insurance under the ACA. These short term policies can be designed with high out-of-pocket maximums, low coverage caps, and significant benefit gaps. They can also deny coverage to those with pre-existing conditions. For these reasons, these policies can be marketed at a lower cost. Plaintiffs representing insurers, providers, and consumer groups sued the administration arguing that the availability of short term plans would draw away younger and healthier individuals from risk pools and put insurers at an unfair disadvantage by forcing them to compete with short term plans that would not be required to comply with the same ACA protections.


Continue Reading Court Upholds Short-Term, Limited Duration Insurance Policy Rule

On Thursday, March 8, the Trump Administration rejected Idaho’s plan to sell health plans that do not include the consumer protections required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The rejection came in the form of a letter touting adherence to current law, though in many ways the letter was written by an apologetic Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wanting to appease Idaho Republicans.

Earlier this year, Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter signed an executive order that allowed some Idaho health insurance plans to drop certain ACA requirements. For example, plans would not need to cover maternity care, mental illness, or other essential health benefits; insurers could charge higher premiums to those with preexisting conditions; and insurers could deny people coverage if they had failed to maintain continuous coverage. Insurers who sold such “junk” plans would be required to also sell at least one ACA-compliant option over the exchanges. Gov. Otter’s actions seemed to test just how far Alex Azar, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, would go to support the “state experimentation” Mr. Azar himself advocated for under the exchanges, as discussed in our earlier post. The answer, for Idaho, is not far enough.
Continue Reading Trump Administration Rejects (Nicely) Idaho’s Attempt to Skirt ACA

On Tuesday, February 20, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar announced that the agency intends to expand access to short-term, low-cost insurance policies. On Wednesday, HHS published its proposed rule, which promises to reduce restrictions on such limited-duration policies. The short-term insurance plans have fewer benefits and more limited consumer protections as compared to those proscribed by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). While such short-term plans currently can only be carried for 90 days, the new proposal would extend that maximum coverage period to one year.

The proposed rule is in response to President Trump’s Executive Order from October 12, 2017, which called for HHS to expand access to low-cost insurance plans. The Executive Order asked the agency to explore the possibility of extending the maximum duration of such short-term, limited-duration plans in order to increase options for consumers. The short-term insurance plans are contemplated for individuals who are unemployed, between jobs, or otherwise looking to reduce premium costs for up to one year. The plans do not have to meet ACA requirements. Notably, they do not have to cover individuals with pre-existing conditions and they do not have to cover prescription drug plans. The plans offer more limited coverage for consumers, but impose less immediate financial burden through reduced premium cost. Insurers who sell the short-term plans would need to include clear statements on applications and plan documents that the coverage does not meet ACA requirements.

The proposed rule continues the Trump administration’s efforts to roll back the ACA and minimize its economic burden and comes just over a year after the president issued an Executive Order laying out that goal. It comes on the heels of earlier rules from the administration geared at stabilizing the individual and small group insurance markets. It also follows the signing of the new tax reform bill, which repeals the individual mandate of Section 5000A of the Tax Code and eliminates the shared responsibility payment for failure to obtain health insurance starting in 2019.


Continue Reading Azar Rolls Out Expansion of Short-Term, Limited-Duration Insurance Plans